Curtis Wright





1. Going Through Carolina
2. Tunnel Tunnel
3. 'Til I'm Dead And Gone
4. I Will Someday
5. It Happens
6. Rainy Day Whiskey
7. Old Man From The Mountain
8. Mama Prayed For Me
9. Never Mind
10. Waiting On My Heart To Break
11. Listening To Whiskey And Talking To Walls
12. Stormy Weather
13. Dixie Chicken

What people are saying

The songs he sings are all coming  straight from the soul. Let's just say that I am, and will always be one of Curtis' biggest fans. -Ronnie Bowman

I'm a #1 fan of Curtis Wright - listening to his amazing voice, and his writing style. I'm excited to hear his new project and so honored to sing on it. -Rhonda Vincent

Curtis Wright has a voice that permeates the soul. Oh yes, there's a heart in there with lots to tell. Thank goodness we have his songs! -Claire Lynch

This boy puts his heart and soul into Bluegrass. He understands it. You're gonna love every heartfelt note! -Dale and Don Wayne Reno

Buy The Album Today

Curtis Wright’s whiskey-seasoned voice and country road storytelling never let go on this long-awaited solo album.

His decades of work as a songwriter and backup singer yield an album full of evocative tunes that make you fall in love with the place they sing about: the maze of roads, taverns, and churches of the American heartland.

An honest sense of yearning fuels the entire work. On the first hit single, “Going Through Carolina” - an easy going on-the-road ballad - Wright’s longing looks to the past, basking in days gone by, but it doesn’t stay there long. The poignant back porch hymn “I Will Someday,” points that same nagging hunger at Wright’s most sacred hope for the future: a home with his God.

But as heartfelt and personal as some of these songs are, Wright doesn’t keep his hand on his heart the whole time. Some tunes he delivers with a hell of a grin. “Tunnel Tunnel,” with it’s old-as-the-hills sound, is about a hard-fought shot at breaking out of prison, and the bluesy “Dixie Chicken” is a classic young man’s tale of love and mischief.

Throughout the album, Wright’s songs have the power to take you places: from your mother’s prayerful bedside when you were a child to a lonesome night of drinking in a just-emptied house. But where they take you isn’t the thing. The thing is that wherever they wander, they have a knack for telling the truth.